fytattoossucks:

always remember that you are never too fat to get a tattoo and don’t let anyone tell you otherwise 

And really, they were people, and most people didn’t need a reason or an excuse to lie or cheat or steal or fuck over other people. They did it because they were selfish and self-important, because they wanted things and didn’t want to wait for them. Humanity was a seething pit of snakes and snake-charmers, waiting to bite or order others to bite.

Not that she was any better. She definitely wasn’t.

Stacia Kane, Keeping It Close (via gottaquoteit)

shadowblinder:

stop condemning female characters for having the exact same traits that your favorite male characters have

nthmetal:

Holy cow where do I even start. Rat Queens is honestly one of those books that just leaves you speechless with not only how fantastic it is, but with how empowering it can be. How do I even begin to summarize it. Just imagine your typical Fantasy Dungeons and Dragons RPG and add some wicked dialogue, a great story and some of the best characters I have ever seen and that’s exactly what you’ll find in Rat Queens.

The art in this book is absolutely beautiful. Roc Upchurch outdoes himself in every single aspect of the word. He tosses aside the notion of traditional comic book women by creating them in different races, shapes and sizes. Which lets be honest its something that the the comic book industry desperately needs. 

Let’s talk about the Rat Queens themselves. Not only does each women focus on a class which you’ll find in almost every fantasy video game, but there’s a wide range of race, strong personality and body types in this book.  By the end of the first issue you’ll find yourself identifying with at least one of these wonderful (and yet often very vulgar) women if not all of them. 

The dialogue is another thing that I absolutely adore about this book. Not only is it sometimes gritty and vulgar but it’s often times god damn funny. Its one of these books that’s impossible to put down mostly because you just don’t want to. And when you’re done reading it you’ll probably just go back and re-read it again (I know I did). 

Everyone should get their hands on Rat Queens. Even if you don’t like comics read this book because I promise you’ll adore it as much as I did. It’s only 7 issues in, so there’s still time to catch up, AND the first trade (which consists of the first five issues) is only ten bucks! Did I mention it’s been picked up for a future Animated Series (BECAUSE IT SO TOTALLY WAS)

So get out there right now and read RAT QUEENS. Because you really don’t have any excuse not to.

aiglet12:

littlebluboxx:

silentauroriamthereal:

nofreedomlove:

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"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

OK SO THERE ARE TONS MORE OF THESE OF THE ARTISTS FB PAGE. GUYS THESE ARE AWESOME.image

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LETS APPLAUD CAROL ROSSETTI EVERYONEimage

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LOOK

Waaah, it’s dusty in my office.

knitmeapony:

I love my skin!

Oh my god SO IMPORTANT SO SO SO IMPORTANT

bogleech:

gameraboy:

"A Sticky Situation" (1960) by Carl Barks

I like how advertising is literally still exactly as sexist as they’re joking about in this comic from 54 years ago.